Taking the Plunge

Taking the Plunge

Taking the Plunge

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Adding a swimming pool to a property is not a small undertaking. Landscape Architect, Craig Wilson shares his expertise on how to seamlessly integrate a swimming pool into your outdoor design.

Before embarking on designing a pool into your property it pays to ask yourself a few important questions to ensure your investment delivers the optimal result you dream of.

The location of your pool is a key factor to consider. A pool can be an central element of your outdoor living space and works well when connected to the other main aspects of your outdoor living space.

For a family or ‘party’ pool this works well, especially where the action of the pool is easily seen and heard from the internal living spaces. If positioned well, the pool can become a water feature on an impressive scale and create visual impact from a formal dining or living space.

In a larger property, the pool can also be a destination in its own right and be tucked well away from main patio spaces surrounded by generous lawn and garden areas.

In Canterbury you will most likely want your pool situated where it will capture afternoon sun with a good degree of protection from the prevailing winds. The design of your pool area should include walls and plantings to protect you from the elements if your site is exposed with no existing shelter.

By law every pool must be fenced so make sure the style complements your design. Frameless glass fencing is a great way to reduce any sense of a ‘visual disconnect’ that other fencing options would otherwise impose.

Knowing what kind of atmosphere you want to create will guide you in the type of materials used for paving, choices of plantings and style of furniture. While many aim to recreate a resort style feel where they can relax with a touch of luxury and contemporary sophistication, others prefer a more naturalistic approach where a native and informal plant palette dominates and the pool lines are soften by plantings and may even includes rocks around the edges.

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